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Tele Vue's Image of the Day Winners
APOD Image of the Day

Since 1995, NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day (or NASA APOD) has been a web resource of the best astronomy images. To meet the enthusiastic response from a world-wide audience of astronomy and nature lovers, the daily annotated image is available on globe-spanning mirror-sites in various languages. At a glance, these viewers might  assume that all gloriously star-studded cluster and fine filamentary nebulae images on the site were products of the Hubble Space Telescope or other exotic observatory. But as the examples below showcase, some of these "Hubble-quality" images were produced with much smaller, portable Tele Vue scopes!

The Sharpless 308: Star Bubble was APOD's Christmas Eve entry for 2013. Taken with a Tele Vue NP-127is and Atik 383L+ camera, it shows the bubble-shaped nebula created by a "wind" of particles from a central Wolf-Rayet star. Read details on how this picture was made.
The An "Etruscan Vase" Rising Moon made APOD's day on February 23, 2009. Taken with a Tele Vue NP-101 and Nikon 300 camera, it shows the Moon rising through an atmospheric inversion layer. The icon at left is only the middle-image of the rising sequence.
The Rosette Nebula made an appropriate choice for NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day on Valentine's Day 2008. A long stem of hydrogen gas can be seen descending from the "rose". The team of Block and Puckett employed the Tele Vue 127is and Apogee U9000 camera in this 27-hour composite exposure.

We are pleased to announce that Tony Hallas' M45 "The Pleiades" and IC353 + IC1995 image was selected as NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day for November 22, 2007. This remarkable color, wide-field image of the Pleiades region reveals dust lanes galore. Imaged with the Tele Vue NP-101is and SBIG STL-11K camera.

This scaled composite shot of the Moon juxtaposed with the Andromeda galaxy was NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day  (APOD) on December 28, 2006. The galaxy was a deep 22-hour(!) exposure with an Apogee U9000 camera taken through a Tele Vue-NP127is telescope. The lunar photo used the same setup but a much shorter exposure.
This TV-102 image of the Sun in Hydrogen Alpha light (cropped here) must be one of the most republished APOD images. It was NASA's Astronomy Picture Of the Day for December 6, 2004, Astronomy.com's Picture of the Day, ATWB Picture of the Day, and has been featured in a plethora of  print, DVD and web-media.
Space.com Image of the Day

SPACE.com is the world's No. 1 source for news of astronomy, skywatching, space exploration, commercial spaceflight and related technologies. The Space.com "Image of the Day" features some of the finest astronomical images produced.

Stellar Sisters was Space.com Image of the Day for November 2, 2006. This Tele Vue-127is with Apogee U9000 camera image of the Pleiades (M45) was taken by Adam Block and Tim Puckett. Exposure time was about 7-hours.
Our Galactic Neighbor was Space.com Image of the Day for December 4, 2006. This Tele Vue-127is with Apogee U9000 camera image of The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) was taken by Adam Block and Tim Puckett. Exposure time was about 22-hours.
Closing in on the Cone was Space.com Image of the Day for April 6, 2007. This Tele Vue-127is with Apogee U9000 camera image of IC 2169 region in the Cone Nebula was taken by Adam Block and Tim Puckett. Exposure time was about 31-hours over 3-months.
Comet Swan's Omen was Space.com Image of the Day for October 13, 2006. This Tele  Vue-85 image of Comet Swan was taken by Tony Cook. Exposure time was unknown.
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